Popularity has a price.

Screen shot 2009-12-15 at Dec 15, 2009, 12.08.13 AMYesterday, unbeknownst to me, I was given an invitation to sit at the “cool table” (or at least the personal finance equivalent of a cool table) with all the popular kids. I woke up yesterday morning, and as usual, checked my blog’s stats first thing. Usually I have about 50 or so visitors by 7am my time. Yesterday was a different story though, I had an incredible 1,300 visitors by early morning. I knew my post on counterintuitive frugality was not the cause of this giant boost in traffic. Checking referral sites revealed The Consumerist posted a blog about my recent 401K article. Here’s a link to their article and here’s a link to mine.

Being featured on the #1 Personal Finance blog makes me smile. It resulted in more visits in one day than I usually see in an entire month, futhermore, it also increased my adsense revenue from the typical $0.12 per day to a whopping $7.04. I’m freaking rich suckers and I owe it all to Phil Villarreal. Thanks dude for referencing my post, feel free to do so whenever you’d like 🙂

I learned something yesterday though, popularity has it’s price. While I would say the majority of the comments in response to my article were positive, there were definitely some that were not-so-positive. Here were two of my favorites….

GuidedByLemons:
“I have been so focused on retirement, I completely forgot to establish a game plan for my 30’s, 40’s, and 50’s.”
Um, how about you, like, draw a paycheck during those years? By working?

You totally took my quote out of context dude. Of course I plan to draw a paycheck, but where is the harm in trying to provide extra income from short term investments? Instead of being income dependent, I’d rather have other streams of money to provide additional financial security. I’m pretty sure I never indicated a desire to lose my job and stop earning income.

Unknown:
your post is so riddled with errors, logic and factual, thats its not worth responding to.

I deleted that comment because it provided no constructive criticism and I don’t think it qualifies as English, but it did make me laugh a little bit. Some people are jerks.

I’m all for constructive criticism, in fact there were quite a few opposing views brought to my attention, but sometimes people need to take a deep breath and relax. My life is different than yours, and so are my investment strategies. I didn’t tell anyone else to reduce their 401K contributions, I simply wrote about what MY strategy was. If you don’t agree with it, that’s A-okay by me.

I think some of the consfusion comes from a misleading opening paragraph in that article. The article states I make an argument against funding your 401K up to the employer match, which isn’t true. Just to be clear…EVERYONE SHOULD CONTINUE TO FUND THEIR 401K TO GET THE EMPLOYER MATCH. I’m sure that was an unintended mistake and really not a big deal as most caught the error, but I did want to take a second to clarify.

Getting to bask in the awesomeness of being highlighted on The Consumerist was definitely the best part of my day, even though some people made their best attempts to bring me down. In the words of Miley Cyrus…

There’s always going to be another mountain
I’m always going to want to make it move
Always going to be an uphill battle,
Sometimes I’m going to have to punch someone in the face lose.

Playing with the popular kids for a day sure was nice, but part of me is definitely relieved to be dealing with my normal PF commenters and readers again. I love you all in a totally non-erotic way 🙂