How To Teach Your Children To Manage Their Money

It’s never too early to start teaching your children about how to manage their money. Keeping track of your spending and managing your finances is something that everyone struggles with from time to time. We all know that a direct payday loan lender can be necessary to help you get by until the next pay day, but teaching your children how to budget is a skill for life and will hopefully keep them out of debt in the future.

Teach Them The Value Of Money

Most children don’t grasp that money needs to be spent carefully and isn’t just used for buying the things they want. The easiest way to show children the value of money is to talk about it when you are food shopping. Ask them to help you to choose the items you put in your trolley and explain whether they’ve chosen the best value item. Point out deals and cheaper alternatives, this will teach them to shop by value and shows them how expensive some items can be!

A Savings Jar

Children who instantly get everything they ask for don’t learn the true value of money. Teaching them that they must wait and save up before they can buy something they want is an important money management lesson. Although a savings account can be useful for older children, a savings jar is a good way to visibly demonstrate to children that the pocket money they save is building up over time. This makes the purchase more satisfying and teaches children the importance of savings and being patient.

Give Them An Allowance

Some parents may disagree with giving their children money. But giving children a small monthly, or weekly, allowance is a good way to teach them some basic budgeting skills. If they know that their allowance is the only money they will have to spend that month, they will soon learn that they can’t have the latest new toy or game every week.  If your children still impulsively spend their money as soon as they get it, try challenging them to wait a few weeks.

If an allowance isn’t something you are comfortable with then offer them the chance to earn their pocket money by completing basic house hold chores. This shows them that hard work can be worthwhile, setting them up for the future.

Keeping Track

Try to encourage your children to keep track of their spending in a notebook. Try to put a fun spin on it by making it a game or giving them an old purse to keep their recipients in. This will help you to explain that some of the things your children are buying- typically things like sweets or the latest fad- are using up a big chunk of their allowance. Alternatively, show them how you manage the family budget. Explain that you have to work so you can afford to buy all the things on the list, so they understand that money doesn’t just get given to you by the bank!

“Finances are so complicated”

How many people have you heard excuse their lackluster personal finances because managing their cash flow seems like too much work. I’m afraid I know a handful of people that are so intimidated by their finances, they choose to ignore them completely. Guess what?! Managing your money is really, really, really simple. Even more simple than this maze…

There are really only three things that can be done with money.

1) Spend it

2) Save/Invest it

4) Steal it

4) Give it

For the love of all that is holy, don’t try and make personal finance more complicated than it should be. Your goal should be to have less than 100% of your money in the “spend” category. Ya got issues if you are spending 103% of your income every month, sadly this is more common than we all realize.

To keep this post short I’m gonna post up the percentage of my income that gets allocatted to each category every month….

Spending: 60%

Save/Invest: 30%

Donate: 10%

So that is the breakdown of my numbers. Keep in mind it is an average, some months my spending was 35% of my monthly income, and other times it was 140%, so it’s important to try to think over the course of a year or so.

Now it’s your turn sucka, why don’t you post up a quick snapshot of your “Spend, Save, Give” percentages. Try to be honest and accurate. There really is no “perfect” breakdown as each of us is unique and has our own perceptions of what is important to us.

p.s. don’t do drugs (yeah, I know that has nothing to do with finances, but I just thought you mind need a friendly reminder :))