Physical and financial fitness

May 20, 2009

I hopped on the scale the other day and saw that I have gained ten pounds in the last year. Yuck! I’m 6’1 and went from 170 to 180. Now some of you are probably thinking “180lbs is still underweight for your height.” I totally agree, I have actually always wanted to weigh around 180lbs so I wouldn’t be the awkwardly skinny kid, but there is a difference between weighing 180lbs and weighing a healthy 180lbs.

My ten pound weight gain is directly correlated to my pathetic exercise schedule over the last year. In college I ran four to six times per week and was probably in the best shape of my life. I was able to keep up with my running for the first year post college, but have seriously sucked it up for the last twelve months. I have only been running about once a month. I noticed my weight increased a couple pounds about four months ago and didn’t really think much of it, but after weighing myself a week ago and seeing the big 1-8-0 on the scale I was not happy. Again, I’m not anorexic and I would not mind weighing 180lbs, but I only want to do so because I am super active and exercising regularly.

So how the heck does my obesity relate to personal finance? It would have been a helluva lot easier for me to never gain the weight in the first place, and always maintain a healthy level of exercise in my daily schedule, but instead I got lazy and as a result gained weight. Sound familiar? Finances are no different. It is a bajillion times easier to never get in to debt than it is trying to dig your way out of it.

Are you financially overweight? Do your bank accounts reflect poor spending habits and a lack of saving? If so, get your obese butt on the financial treadmill and shed some pounds, or in this case debt! If your young, start forming healthy financial habits now. Learn everything you can about how to make your dollar work for you. Don’t be tempted by material objects. Don’t buy that new car. If you find yourself in a heap of debt, who cares! It’s never to late to start exercising. You don’t have to be in shape to exercise, and you don’t have to be rich to save. You have to make becoming financially fit a priority. Start a budget, pay yourself first, pay off debt, and you will start to see the benefits of a little financial workout.

Don’t be that guy that sits on his couch watching American Idol, eating a microwave dinner, that says “I’ve tried dieting and exercise, but it’s impossible to lose weight.” Or that girl that says “I can’t afford to pay my rent” because she just went to the mall and dropped a G at Nordies. You are in control and it is imperative that you exhibit financial discipline. There is so much more that I want to say, but I’ve probably offended a hand full of people and will leave it here for the time being.

Yo mommas so poor, she had to take out a second mortgage on her cardboard box.

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