Why am i awake at 4am?

So I won’t be posting any great content today. I’m staying at Grandma Ninja’s house and she doesn’t have Internet (I know it’s crazy). I’m typing this right now on my iPhone and hoping autocorrect doesn’t mess this post up. I’ll be back to normal posting on Monday.

On a side note, my aunt is a huge fan of Black Friday shopping so I told her I would go along for the experience. I’m hoping I’ll get some good stories from it to share on here. The morning begins at 4am ( I didn’t even know 4am existed). Pray that I come out alive.

Happy turkey day

Just wanted to take a quick minute to say happy thanksgiving to everyone. Today I am thankful for garlic mashed potatoes!

Question dark turkey meat or white meat? I’m a dark meat kinda guy. Anyone that disagrees is a turkey racist ๐Ÿ™‚

p.s. If you are reading this via RSS you should actually visit my site today. I have a special holiday banner.

Are you crazy, or am I?

Screen shot 2009-11-24 at Nov 24, 2009, 9.46.05 PMSo apparently I’m the only PF person in the world that would consider taking a job cleaning sewers if the pay was substantial. I’m not going to say I’m surprised by that. I actually had Girl Ninja read yesterday’s post before it went live and she mirrored the same thoughts you all did. I have a thousand different arguments and justifications for why I am right and you all are lame, but in reality, when it’s one versus thirteen, I must be the crazy one.

I’ve been fortunate enough to never have a job I hated. Sure, I’ve had some that were not ideal, but I’ve always managed to make whatever I’m doing enjoyable. I’m too young, too ambitious, and too happy to put myself in a crappy work environment. My question, to all of you who commented yesterday that you had jobs you hated: Why? Was it your attitude? Was it the people? The pay? Why the heck didn’t you quit the second you despised it? Surely you could have found some type of employment elsewhere? If money was not important, then why didn’t you quit immediately and apply to McDonald’s?

Okay, moving on. I mentioned yesterday, there was one exception to my willingness to work anywhere for a CRAZY HIGH salary. Wanna know what that exception is? Time. I would never work somewhere that required more than 50 hours a week of work. That’s right, I said never. Not even for the coolest, sweetest, awesomest job in the world. Work has never been, and will never be what is most important to me. Family, friends, and fun will always come before work.

I was talking with a physician the other day, and he mentioned he works a little over 100 hours a week. Holy guacamole! I realize there are other work-a-holics out there, perhaps some reading this, that work 70, 80, 90 hour weeks. It makes sense to work a lot, if work is at the top of your priorities. For me it hasn’t been, nor will it ever be. I’ll give you 40 hours of my week, occasionally more, but never will I spend more waking hours “on the clock” than I will off.

I may be willing to be a pooper scooper for $100,000/yr, but I would never be a professional ice cream taster working 60 hours a week for similar pay. So now let’s run another poll. If you had to be at a job that you weren’t particularly fond of (think lawn mower) for 40hrs/wk, or you could have a job you enjoyed (think rodeo clown) but had to work 60hrs/wk, what would you do? You know my opinion, what’s yours?

Most jobs have their price

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Dude, I would totally work just about any job if the money was right. You name it, manual labor, pedicurist, port-o-potty cleaner, pay me enough and I’ll submit my application. Does this make me a “sellout”? Possibly. After all, I would be working for “the money” and not “the passion”. Well guess what ya’ll. I’m a freakin’ sellout.

The inspiration for this post came from a conversation I had with my roommate the other day. It went a little like this….

Him: Would you work a job you didn’t enjoy if it paid a lot?

Me: Yes.

Him: Really? You don’t think you would end up unhappy in the end?

Me: No

Him: Care to explain.

Me: Not really, but I’m gonna go eat a twinkie.

Okay, well that’s not exactly how the conversation went. I basically told him, that no matter how miserable the job, I think money can help make things less miserable. That’s not to say that money can buy happiness, but it can definitely help.

My dreaded career would be anything involving history (I hate history). I would despise having to read old books, about old people, who did things a really long time ago. No offense to any historians out there, it’s just not my thing. But if you pay me $200,000/yr to read about Mesopotamia, you’ll get yourself one historically educated ninja ready for work.

Although money wouldn’t change the type of work I was doing, it would definitely change my attitude. And even though I may sacrifice a little bit of my happiness from 9 to 5, I’d totally be able to make up for it during my time off. Work might suck, but I still imagine my overall quality of life would be pretty epic.

Sure I would “sell my soul” for most positions, but I do have ONE exception to that rule. You are gonna have to come back tomorrow though to see what that exception is. So how bout it? Would you be willing to do some “less than desirable” work for a RIDICULOUSLY higher pay? And for those that totally disagree….care to share what jobs you would never do, no matter what the pay?

What are you worried about?

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I’ve never really understood why asking people about money is off limits. What are people worried about? Why is it offensive to ask someone how much their new car cost, how big their mortgage is, or how much they are contributing to their 401K? Finances are often a “don’t ask, don’t tell” gig.

Now I’m not saying that everyone needs to be comfortable sharing their financial status with anyone that asks. Obviously if a stranger wants to know how much debt you have, you have my blessing to punch them in the face. Similarly, I believe salary should definitely be kept confidential within the work place (causes too much office drama if Pamela makes more than Carmen). Budgets Are Sexy wrote a great article highlighting the times it is NOT appropriate to ask someone about their income.

One of my favorite ways to learn is through conversation with friends and family. How the heck am I suppose to be financially educated if I can’t really talk about money with anyone I associate with? It’s not like the school systems teach the fundamental of finances. What are we scared of? Are our friends going to judge us because we make too much money, or not enough? Why are things like mortgages, student loans, and credit card debt never to be discussed?

I know where most of my friends stand in regards to their political and religious views, but for some strange reason I feel like they would shoot me if I asked “Have ya been saving for retirement?” Sure, there are situations in which discussing one’s financial situation is inappropriate, but I also believe there are times when finances NEED to be discussed, but aren’t, out of fear of the other party becoming offended. Screw that. I’m laying it all out there. My name is Debt Ninja and this is my financial situation…

Annual Income: $50,547
Cash in Savings: $18,755
Total Debt: $16,877
Percent of income contributed to retirement: 18% + (5% match)
Number of Credit Cards: 3
Annual burrito expenses: $600

You don’t have to be scared. My blog is a “safe place”. No one will judge you no matter what your financial situation. Are you feeling bold? Care to share your financial situation? Any thoughts on why finances are so taboo?

p.s. For those that haven’t commented before, today’s post would be a great day to come out of hiding ๐Ÿ™‚

“Good debt” is for dumb people

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I was facebook chatting yesterday with one of my loyal readers. She was discussing her car loan, when I mentioned my student loan. She said “At least your student loan is ‘good debt’.” She put good debt in quotes because she knows (and I know) there ain’t no such thing as good debt (did you know ain’t IS a word?).

Typically student loans and mortgages are considered good debt. Why? The thought is, with student loans you obtain a degree, and with a degree you get a higher paying job. For mortgage, you take on a loan, buy a house, and sell the house for a profit. Nice idea right?

Have you read my blog’s title? Is it Punch Bad Debt In The Face? I don’t think so suckers. There is no such thing as good debt. Debt is debt…period. A degree doesn’t guarantee higher income, no more than your home guarantees increasing in value. So don’t fall for the trap and think you should keep Sallie Mae around for the 20 year visit she is planning to take.

It’s time to change the classification of debt. There is bad debt (which we all know as credit cards, payday loans, etc) and not-as-sucky-but-still-pretty-crappy debt (student loans, mortgage). Whoever decided to call some debt “good” was a genius. Heck, I wonder how much money that label has made the banks. Probably at least ten dollars ๐Ÿ™‚

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not opposed to utilizing debt to get an education or buy a home. In fact, I’m 99.9% sure I will take out a mortgage. But don’t trick yourself in to thinking that your mortgage is good. It should still be seen as a money hungry beast that won’t go away until you MAKE IT go away. Were you like me and once thoughtย  “good debt” existed? If I could go back in time, I probably would have gone to a public college, saved a ton of money, and graduated debt free. Oh to be young, naive, and easily influenced.

p.s. Anyone that thinks student loans are “good debt” is more than welcome to have mine ๐Ÿ™‚