Financial summary in 140 characters

If you don’t have a Twitter account then you can’t follow me on twitter. And if you aren’t following me on twitter, you’re super lame.

The thing that makes Twitter so interesting is you have to communicate an entire thought using no more than 140 characters. Sometimes this is easy, for example,

“Cats are the worst thing to ever happen to society.”

Other times it can be quite difficult.

Let’s make things a little interesting and try to communicate our entire financial history via a 140 character (or less) sentence. Here’s mine….

$28,000 student loan debt. Punched Sallie Mae in the face. Saved hard. Bought a house. Baby on the way.

See that was easy wasn’t it!!! Alright I have to get off this iPad before Girl Ninja starts beating me (she’s been known to be abusive :)).

20 thoughts on “Financial summary in 140 characters

  1. “you’re either super lame or a pedophile”

    As a regular reader, I didn´t apreciate the joke. More, I´ve assumed that someone that writes such a thing may not be the best source of information… of any kind.

      • Regular reader also… I really have enjoyed following this blog for the past 6 months because I like the combination of stick figures, humor, and personal life, along with interesting financial ideas, discussions, and information. I was pleasantly surprised to find this as a source of information as I will be graduating with my PhD in developmental psychology this June, just reached my 30s, and have quite a lot of financial catching up to do. Thus, I hopped on the “follow me by email train”.

        However, I have to agree with Cristina, perhaps because I work closely with people in who have been sexually abused in childhood.. Seeing that joke made me stop short and gave me an icky feeling. I know it is meant to be funny and that word gets thrown around a lot but it is really not something to use so lightly in my humble opinion.

        • You’re totally right I didn’t really think of the implications of the sarcasm and the trauma that could be associated with it for some. Thanks for bringing me back to reality.

    • Ditto – I’ve also been a regular reader who found that pretty offensive, especially as I am neither super lame nor a pedophile – I honestly just have better things to do than follow you – or anyone else – on Twitter. I’d rather spend time with my family and friends.

      Ninja, I must say that lately your posts have been a bit vulgar or “in your face” opinionated, rather than the thoughtful well expressed opinions I appreciated. Please return to that style, and the values that attracted me (and other readers) to you, or I’ll need to unsubscribe. I can find enough trolls who say vile things
      on the net already.

    • Long time reader too. I really didn’t appreciate the whole pedophile joke. It caught me by surprise, and frankly, I didn’t think it was funny at all.

  2. $130K Law School debt + $30K home downpayment debt + 1 baby + 3 years of butt-kicking saving = $0 debt w/ a great salary.

  3. “Debt free thanks to an inheritance and a foreclosure. That’s right, i said thanks to a foreclosure.”

  4. $65K in debt with nothing to show for it. No house, car, or fancy clothes, just lots of bad decisions. Got intense, paid it off, now have a NW of $545K and on my way to FI.

  5. 30 yo. Mortgage will be paid off this year. Then debt freedom (from total debt $180k)! Next goal: saving hard for VERY early retirement.

  6. Thanks for removing! 🙂

    I actually participated without realizing it in my first comment..

    I will be graduating with my PhD this June, just reached my 30s, and have quite a lot of financial catching up to do.

  7. I’m following you on Twitter but you’re not following me. You should try to help a girl out who’s trying to “Punch Debt in the Face”.

    On our 4th refinancing, $346K mortgage which includes $248K consumer debt, $48K vehicle debt, 7 years from retirement. Will we make it?

  8. Squandered my 20’s. Finally saw the light and began saving. Just started non-retirement investing. Feeling optimistic. Woot!

  9. At 65+, getting close to retirement. Not the richest or the highest paid, but very low debt and a decent balance in the IRA and 401(k).

Comments are closed.