I’d do it differently

I entered college, fall 2003, a young and ambitious accounting major. I picked accounting because I  knew they made a lot of money and I was pretty bada$$ with a TI-83. While I did well in my first macroeconomics course, I quickly realized that “business” related subjects were of no interest to me. My introduction to psychology course, however, was a different story. I was fascinated by the content. I loved learning about the brain and how people work. I changed my major after my first semester, and eventually walked across the stage with a B.A. in Psych.

I don’t regret being a psych major for one minute. I loved my classes, LOVED my professors (I actually played tennis with them every Tuesday and Thursday morning), and just generally loved the whole psych department. That said, if I traveled back in time to 2003, I am 99% sure I would not graduate with a degree in psychology.

While I may have loved the content and the people in my major, I didn’t really love the career fields psych generally leads to (i.e. counseling). I almost feel like my degree limits my potential, especially when it comes to job hunting. My degree does very little to highlight my strengths. When a recruiter reviews my resume and sees a B.A. in Psychology, he is not going to know that I also took Organic Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, Statistics, and Biochemistry (none of which were required by my major). While I could have taken “bowling”, “Intro to photography”, or some other class to satisfy the credits required to graduate, I decided to take challenging courses for my general electives.

Do I believe your major is the determining factor in one’s career potential? Absoultely not. But there are positions I would love to apply for, but can’t, simply because I don’t have a degree in business administration or the like. Take for example the Finance industry. It would be darn near impossible for me to land an interview for any kind of legitimate position in the financial sector… even though I may be more knowledgeable and capable than other applicants with business related degrees. Ten years down the road, I’m sure my education will become less of a factor with prospective employers, but when you are 24 years old, and have only a few years of work under your belt, you better believe your education is going to be HEAVILY considered.

That said, I refuse to let my degree be a limiting factor in my career growth. There are a million different means by which I can prove to my prospective employer that I really am the best candidate for the job, even if my degree is not specifically related to the field. And you better believe I will be highlighting each of those strengths during my next interview.

If I had the opportunity to do college again I would probably get my degree in Statistics or Math. And I would probably have gone to a state school instead of a private college (although I totally loved my school). Gosh, this makes me want to go punch a business major in the face (only kidding). Okay, I’m done dwelling on the past. Time to move forward.

What was your major in college?

If you could do college again, would you choose a different major?

If you didn’t go to college, do you wish you did?

Anyone out there that went to college, wish they hadn’t?

p.s. if you are wondering if you blew it when you picked your major, take a look at this chart of the ten “worst” college degrees…

College Degrees                Starting Salary

  1. Social Work                        $33,400
  2. Elementary Education         $33,000
  3. Theology                            $34,800
  4. Music                                 $34,000
  5. Spanish                              $35,600
  6. Horticulture                        $37,200
  7. Education                           $36,200
  8. Hospitality/Tourism           $37,000
  9. Fine Arts                            $35,800
  10. Drama                                $35,600

56 thoughts on “I’d do it differently

  1. 1. Chemical Engineering
    2. No but I’d go to a bigger school (for more networking/job prospects when I graduated)

    Accountants are boring. I’ve never met one who could hold a conversation about something other than work…and they all work too many hours. Month Close, quarter close, tax time..year end stuff. I think you made the right decision. I liked math and I almost did accounting until my teacher talked me out of it. She said it was pure drudgery and from what I see, she was spot on. Interesting how you picked up on the personalities of these folks even in college.

    My rule was that I would only shell out all that dough to go to school if I had a marketable skill when I finished…and a good enough salary to be able to pay back my loans when I was done. So I would’ve never majored in math, but I would’ve considered being a statistician, for example. I consider any degree in science or math (not just psych) career limiting unless you go on to get your MS or PHD. Most of my science major friends got crappy starting salaries/opportunities and decided they had to go back to grad school to have any kind of career.

    Ninja, you’re very lucky to have landed a high paying job with your BS. Have you ever thought of grad school?

  2. Well this may be a bit different because I am in Canada, but my degree was in Child Development and then I did a teaching degree. This is apparently the second worst degree from a financial standpoint. While the starting salary wasn’t great, one is able to move up the salary grid fairly quickly. I have been teaching 10 years and if I were working full time (which I don’t by choice) I would currently be making nearly $80K. In another two years that would be over $90K.
    I do sometimes regret my undergraduate major as it really is only applicable to teaching – lots of psychology and sociology. It would be hard to change careers – which I don’t plan to do anyway.
    I am graduating today though with my Masters degree in Education, which will open up more doors for me, career-wise.

  3. What was your major in college? English and Education. My husband did not go to college but he makes more money than me.

    If you could do college again, would you choose a different major? I’m not sure that I would. I love my job right now, but there may come a time when I’m burnt out. My second love is Student Affairs (I was an RA and an RD in college), and I could get my MA in that sometime in the future.
    Like you, I regret my private college education. I loved my college experience, but I hate paying back $50k in student loans. Bah!

  4. 1st degree: nutritional science. yes, I did blow it because i didn’t realize until my senior year how much i would hate it and by that time I felt that I had to finish or I would have wasted thousands of dollars in loans. I loved the medical science aspect but hated “counseling” patients. yuck.

    BUT, three years after graduation and working low-end degree unrelated jobs, I discovered a new degree program. Because my first degree was so closely related, I only have to take the senior level courses (one year worth) and I’m going to be doing something that I totally love and making more than I would have as a dietitian.

    SCORE!

    oh, p.s. My dad worked in sales his whole life then decided he wanted to get into the finance sector. He had no degree, just taught himself about finance and investing and was able to get a job… and be quite successful at it. It probably would be impossible to land an interview in that sector with this economy but in normal times you could definitely do it.

    • This past weekend I was talking to my parents financial advisors and one of them only has his AA and the other got into the field after dropping out of high school. The one who was a drop out has since gone back and got her masters (in psychology) so she can eventually leave finance and become a career counselor.

      So yes you can with out a finance degree tho I agree it probably much harder…I’m about to attempt it myself.

  5. Egads, I hope I don’t blow the curve!

    My undergraduate degree is in Political Science/ International Development. If I were logically advising someone on what to choose for university, I would NOT choose that. So many of my friends and colleagues have had a huge uphill struggle in getting jobs after a degree like that. EXCEPT- I got a good job, in the field, doing exactly what I want, right out of school.

    Would I go back and redo anything? Well, I obviously have no issue with the degree itself. Looking back on the whole university experience though? I would go to a different school. I chose to stay at home and attend the university in my city so I didn’t have to move and I could save money. I really feel like I missed out on big parts of the university experience, I could have gotten a completely different geographical perspective, and (frankly) gone to a better school.

    Now if there’s a degree I wish I could take back, it’s the Master’s I took on later on… I went, and I really really wish I hadn’t.

  6. Egads, I hope I don’t blow the curve!

    My undergraduate degree is in Political Science/ International Development. If I were logically advising someone on what to choose for university, I would NOT choose that. So many of my friends and colleagues have had a huge uphill struggle in getting jobs after a degree like that. EXCEPT- I got a good job, in the field, doing exactly what I want, right out of school.

    Would I go back and redo anything? Well, I obviously have no issue with the degree itself. Looking back on the whole university experience though? I would go to a different school. I chose to stay at home and attend the university in my city so I didn’t have to move and I could save money. I really feel like I missed out on big parts of the university experience, I could have gotten a completely different geographical perspective, and (frankly) gone to a better school.

    Now if there’s a degree I wish I could take back, it’s the Master’s I took on later on… I went, and I really really wish I hadn’t.

  7. I have an Hon BSc Chemistry. I’m currently completing a BComm in Accounting. If I had to do it over, I’m not sure if i would do it differently. One of the reasons I’m getting the BComm now is my work is helping to pay for it as part of an employee training program.. so I just have to do the work, but not have to come up with the cash.. not a bad deal. I might minor in accounting.. I got a certificate in Environment Conservation instead of a minor the first time around..

  8. I went to Michigan State, which is a huge University. I wish I had gone somewhere smaller as it is hard to learn math when you have 400 people in your class. But, I met my husband there, so it all worked out.

    I started out as a math major, with the intent of becoming a high school math teacher. As I got older, I realized I didn’t want to be interacting solely with teens for the rest of my life, so I switched to Finance. (You can punch me in the face now). I then went on to get an MBA in Materials and Logistics Management.

    However, I ended up being a computer programmer, which I hated. Go figure.

    It is true that you can become anything you want to be. But, you may need to get some certifications along the way. (Especially if you consider accounting – a CPA is invaluable for accountants, even if you don’t do CPA work. Financial Planners obviously take CFP courses.)

    • I feel the opposite but perhaps that is because I already had experience.

      I spent my freshmen year of college in a teeny tiny private college in New Hampshire and hated it. It was just highschool all over again. I transferred to Michigan State and LOVED it! Because there were so many students, only a few would ever see the professor during office hours so they were usually very available and enjoyed helping if you seeked them out.

      I do regret paying out of state tuition at MSU and wish that I had got an apartment and paid the in-state rate so my student loans would be half the size they are now.

      • I loved MSU itself. I just went to a very bad high school that left me ill-prepared for college. (No study habits whatsoever, so some hand-holding may have been beneficial for me for freshman year.)

        Grad school was perfect. It was the environment I would have preferred for undergrad. Classes under 20 students and a lot of discussion vs. constant note-taking.

  9. I received a Bachelor of Applied Sciences in Applied Human Nutrition. Yes, I think I would do it all again, but prepare better financially. Once you complete your degree, you have to complete a 1-year Dietetic Internship in order to practise as a Registered Dietitian. When I started in the program, these internships were paid positions. By the time I finished the 4 year degree, our provincial government decided to take away the salary. I just could not afford to work 40-50 hour weeks for no pay. So I didn’t complete the internship as I had no means to support myself. I would have worked harder and smarter in order to save enough to support myself.

    If you didn’t go to college, do you wish you did?

    Anyone out there that went to college, wish they hadn’t?

  10. I got a BS in chemistry and I def would not do it again. I work in quality control for a pharma company whch is completely mind numbing. I need a grad degree to do most of the fun stuff and even then I’m not sure I want to do chemistry forever.

    I would love to have my own business or even work for a company that allows working from home a lot. Basically I hate coming to the same place everyday, doing the same things at the same times. I work a PT job in the wedding industry and love it. I meet all different kinds of people, travel around the state, never work from an office and have a variable schedule. Unfortunately even if I could do it FT, it wouldn’t pay the bills. I could however open a franchise if I decided to move.

  11. I’m getting my diploma this July! I’ll have a BA in political science with a minor in foreign languages (emphasis Persian). I’m starting this fall for a masters in public administration along with what is essentially an internship with the Dept. of Defense. Basically this setup means that I will always have the right degrees to get on in civil service which has been my goal for ages. That way I can apply for transfers all over the country, and if I’m good enough, all over the world. It’s the perfect balance of security and adventure, and I wouldn’t do anything different at the moment. Ask me again in 10 years if I’m happy with the decisions I made.

    College is such a tricky thing to get right–because right now, at 21, I’m loving every choice I’m making. To my 21-year-old brain, there’s not a better choice. But hello. Making decisions that affect the rest of your life from the ages of 17-21?? That definitely doesn’t guarantee that you’ll make the right choices.

  12. Ninja: “My degree does very little to highlight my strengths. When a recruiter reviews my resume and sees a B.A. in Psychology, he is not going to know that I also took Organic Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, Statistics, and Biochemistry (none of which were required by my major).”

    All that can easily be added as a line on the resume.

    “Ten years down the road, I’m sure my education will become less of a factor with prospective employers, but when you are 24 years old, and have only a few years of work under your belt, you better believe your education is going to be HEAVILY considered.”

    Exactly.

    I started by majoring in music and switched to English. I have a Ph.D. in English from Rutgers, which seemed like a good idea at the time because I was planning to teach college English. After doing that for about eight years, I lost a close tenure decision and switched my career to technical writing. There have been times when the Ph.D. has been a stumbling block in applying for business jobs, but I don’t seriously regret having done it.

  13. 1. Materials engineering
    2. I do not regret choosing my major. It was challenging in school, and I busted my butt doing homework for hours every night but its worth it.

  14. 1. BS in business/international business.
    2. i def do not regret my major as i know it can open the doors to a huge variety of job opportunities.

    i dont regret college, i loved the school i went to and i have nothing but fond memories of my time at school. hopefully over the next decade i can use all the skills i learned and move up in my chosen field!
    Preferred Financial Services Blog

  15. Hey Ninja,

    Long time reader first time poster. This post really caught my attention as I recently have been thinking about career choices and the like.

    1.I attained my B.A. in Public Relaitons in the Fall of ’09

    2. If I could do college again I’d probably choose anthropology or surveying work.

    3. My initial plan was to not go to college and join the air force to learn Arabic.

    While I’ve been out of college and working now at a salaried office job ( I work with computers) I am longing for doing something different. I am still considering joining the military and then going back to school, I’m taking my time and money now to finish paying off my loans though.

  16. What was your major in college? BBA in Marketing

    If you could do college again, would you choose a different major? Probably. While I enjoy the creative side of my job, sometimes it’s difficult to be taken seriously in my industry (A/E/C). Plus, I have a very technical mind, and wish I would of explored more math-based careers (i.e. accounting or engineering). But every job has it’s issues.

    Anyone out there that went to college, wish they hadn’t? My husband went to a private college for 5 years, so you can only imagine the amount of student loans we have. While he doesn’t regret going to college, he does regret going to a private one. It’s hard to see friends who didn’t go to college, and who don’t have that debt doing better than you. However, we both feel our earning potential is much greater because we are degreed.

  17. I majored in Organization Communication which is similar to a Business major. I also had a business minor. If I could do college again I would seriously consider becoming an RN. Right now I actually love my job and it is related to my major. I would strongly warn against going into a finance related field. I spent my first seven years out of college working in the banking/finance world. I hated every minute of that career and I worked with some of the most awful mangement you can imagine. After being treated terribly by managers and customers for so many years I was laid off in 2008 which was a relief. I do enjoy my current job but they pay isn’t too great.

  18. I got my BA and double-majored in sociology and economics. I wouldn’t change it – econ majors do pretty well in the job market, and I am going to get my PhD in sociology next fall, so I suppose sociology was a good choice for me!

    I would probably pick a more “name-brand” school if I had to do it over again, because I went to a no-name liberal arts college that gave me a great education but does little for my resume. Sigh.

  19. A friend of mine got a job as a financial adviser pretty much right out of college, and he was a Broadcasting Major… so it’s not impossible.

  20. I am a few months away from graduating with a Bachelor of Philosophy in Interdisciplinary Leadership Studies (no joke, that is the name).
    I made my choice at the age of 17 and while it was an amazing program, with international development internships, community group projects, and a wealth of elective choices…try saying that name to someone and getting them to listen to your explanation long enough…!
    Now, I am teaching English to adults and planning on getting my CELTA (for teaching adults) which will hopefully help me a bit. The trouble is, I do not feel like going back to square one for a full education degree, then Masters…so this rando degree+CELTA+a lot of experience teaching ESL will have to do…

  21. I was a double major in Economics and Math, and I wouldn’t change my majors, though I WOULD have put a little more effort into my math classes than I did. 🙂 All in all, I am happy with what I do and I am getting my masters in Econ now.

    Also, the state school I went to fit me to a T–the professors were really accessible in my departments and I knew them very well. I pretty much got to do whatever I wanted class-wise in the Econ department, and the Math department was really flexible as well.

  22. 1. B.S. in Sociology
    2. I wish I would of double majored in Computer Science.
    I love Sociology and was eager to get my degree done in 4 years, but I was working with computers as my student job. I should of picked up the second major and stayed a 5th year. I also wish I would of studied abroad for a semester or year.

  23. Wow! Everyone is beating up on the accountants. I did accounting, because I was paying my own way and needed a major that would pay at the end. And I really disagree with the first comment – in my big four office, I had one accountant who ran a record label out of their own home, one who was in a rock band, I’m a competitive dancer, one who was a world traveler…the thing about most accountants is that they are doing accounting to pay the bills so they can pursue their passion on the side. And most of them don’t do it forever. The girl next to me quit after working for 5 years to open her own store (after accumulating capital through her 20’s.)

    So I guess it all depends on perspective. I’m no longer in public accounting but I love my job and the only reason my job is so sweet and pays so well is because there simply aren’t enough people willing to do it! I did graduate from the #1 accounting program in the country so maybe my group of peers is more likely be doing interesting and unusual things? Also, this May, my Alma Mata had a 90% of their graduates receive job offers before graduation. (The remaining 10% were international students who needed sponsorship and didn’t get it).

    • It must be because I worked for a Fortune 100 company (think huge). The type of accountants that go to work for “the man” are almost never fun or cool…unless you think pulling an all nighter at work is cool. They were mostly toadies wanting to climb the corporate ladder as quickly as possible. In fact, picturing any one of them dancing or playing music brings up very odd images in my head.

      Where I worked, it was the technical people (engineers and IT) that were the world travelers and had many outside hobbies.

      Totally agree about paying the bills though. My 2 biggest criteria were: starting salary and job placement rate. Accountants were up there. In hindsight, quality of life (# of hours worked) and job location would have been added to my original list.

    • I totally disagree with comment the first comment too. I’m also an accounting major and worked at a pretty big accounting firm as well. I didn’t find my co-workers to be boring, toadies. They weren’t any more/less boring than any other co-workers I’ve had and I’ve worked at a variety of jobs since high school. So…

      1.) Majored in accounting (actual degree is Bachelor of Science in Business)
      2.) No, I’d stay with accounting. It’s allowed me the freedom/flexiblity to stay home with my son before he goes to school while still keeping my mind sharp if I decide to re-enter the full-time workforce.

  24. After you learned the outcomes of the process, the process will always be more clear. Always leverage what you know and your immediate environment; this is how to make the most of any process!

    (I’m a lame ass chemical engineer who still isn’t sure what I want to be when I grow up.)

  25. 1.) BS in Civil Engineering
    2.) Heck no, love my major, love the classes, people and profs.

    I also went to a very pricey private school (Santa Clara Univ.) but felt it was well worth it for several reasons…I went only because I earned the scholarships I needed to go there; the school was the perfect size (not too big or small); I felt the school did well in approaching school in a holistic way; and it provided incredible networking opportunities/connections.

    Also, my school has a large business program and I have many friends who were accounting majors and very cool people. Although their work can be very tedious, it provides a great spring board and background into other business ventures.

  26. This post just confirms my opinion that most HS graduates need a gap year (or two) before going to college. Getting some real world experience might help 17/18-year-olds make more informed decisions when it comes to choosing a college and a major — because even if you go to college and don’t choose a major for two years, what happens when you decide you want a major that’s not offered at your current school? Then you have to deal with transfer credits, additional classes, etc. And yes, I did have a gap year (or 3) before going to college on a full scholarship, during which I worked full time.

    What was your major in college?
    Communication

    If you could do college again, would you choose a different major?
    No — like Ninja, I loved Psychology, but I chose to minor in it instead. But I love writing/editing. If anything, I’d go for a business/finance degree, knowing my interests now!

    Anyone out there that went to college, wish they hadn’t?
    I sometimes think I could have gotten away without going to college due to my work experience (I’ve been working FT in journalism since I was 19), but I realize that as I get older, the job search gets more competitive — many of my friends are getting master’s degrees to keep up.

  27. I decided not to go to school at all and figured that acquiring assets would be a lot more lucrative. You know. A lot of the time I’m just Buying silver and gold of folks, trading options or working on some of my literary projects.

    I gotta hand it for people who decide to chase their education though, they’re the pack mule that holds up the world for the rest of us.

    I got no regrets for not going though. It’s true when they say that professional education is no longer a pre-requisite to financial success. Financial intelligence is.

  28. I majored in Computer Science.

    I love the degree I got, but do wish I had gone to a more reputable school over the private school I attended.

    It helps that there is a very volatile market for people with my degree. It gives me a lot of flexibility to seek out opportunities in a lot of different sectors: government, healthcare, finance, sales, insurance (which is what I currently do), etc. There are also a lot of different positions I could potentially qualify for, so that gives me a bright future.

    The big challenge of my career choice is that technology is constantly changing and that requires me to stay on top of learning new techniques, patterns, etc. That isn’t bad, though. I love to learn.

  29. My major was Marketing and I wish I didn’t need to go to college just to get interviews. I met my husband, so I wouldn’t change a thing, but I work in a job that doesn’t use my degree and I started at $26,500 in 2005. I don’t blame college for my job, but it was a waste of money since I wasn’t passionate about ANY major…

  30. “When a recruiter reviews my resume and sees a B.A. in Psychology, a B.A. in Psychology, he is not going to know that I also took Organic Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, Statistics, and Biochemistry (none of which were required by my major).”

    I find that interesting. When I majored in Psych a few years ago, you had to take at least two lab sciences, calculus, and stats in order to be accepted into the major. It’s still the requirement, but I guess it depends on the school. It’s too bad that people don’t consider you may have a strong background in other areas thanks to the extra classes you take to make up units for completing your bachelors. It’d be nice if they actually had a field for you to enter other areas you have had background in.

    What was your major in college?
    English and Communication, with strong Psychology background (no minor available)

    If you could do college again, would you choose a different major?
    I would actually just triple-major with Psychology and suck it up (in regards to the extra time needed and rat experiment classes).

    Anyone out there that went to college, wish they hadn’t?
    I loved the experience and would never take it back. I don’t believe it’s for everyone but it’s an unforgettable experience for those enjoy scholastic endeavors.

  31. What was your major in college?
    English, with an emphasis on Creative Writing.

    If you could do college again, would you choose a different major?
    Hell yes.

    Anyone out there that went to college, wish they hadn’t?
    I wish I hadn’t gone so soon. I actually did a program where I replaced my last two years of high school with college. I think I would’ve made a better decision in regards to major choice/career path if I’d worked a little in my late teens.

  32. I take issue with the statement that those 10 listed are the “worst” college degrees. Sorry Ninja, but if you’re going to cite such things, make reference and state why they’re the “worst.” I’m guessing that you mean in pay and probably read the article where this came from. As a point, it is important to note that these salaries are not based in accuracy across the board. The NASW (National Association of Social Workers) came out with an article in response to this pointing out the inaccuracy of the $33,400 amount listed. I’d attach their salary study,but it’s far too long.

    I have a BA in Psychology, a Master of Social Work and am currently an Associate Clinical Social Worker (ACSW) working toward LCSW. I like the field and have enjoyed most of the work I’ve done varying from areas such as inpatient Psych to HIV/AIDS to Dialysis and now sitting in a cubicle working for a nonprofit health insurance (oxymoron, I know). I like that I can do so many different things under my degrees, but greatly dislike that it took 7yrs and a graduate degree to get the salary I should have started off with. Especially when a business major can do it with only a BA. They always say one doesn’t do this work for the money,but that doesn’t mean I don’t want to be paid what I’m worth. There are lots of other things I would like to do instead, and since I graduated so young with a Master’s (24yo), I feel I can look into other things. Like individual therapy (ie: independent business owner) or becoming a Life Coach (making $150/hr) or even going to cosmetology school just ’cause I always wanted to. I still feel the door is wide open to me if I want.

  33. I have a BA in English. It’s served me well, for the most part–I’ve worked as a proofreader/editor for my entire post-college career, which is what I wanted to do once I realized that I was too self-conscious to teach. My dad was right, though–I make so much less than what most of my friends do. Like, 10–20K less. I am grateful that I went to an in-state school and did not graduate with student loans that I had to pay off. I have considered graduate school for library science, which I know I would love, but I have a hard time reconciling the relatively low salary of a librarian vs. the money I would have to spend on graduate school. My BF is a hair stylist and loves it. I think he does regret not having a four-year degree, but you know what? His job can NEVER be outsourced. That is worth its weight in gold. Plus, I have so much respect for anyone in a skilled trade.

  34. Funny…I started as a psych major and LOVED it. Then, 3 years in, my professors all began telling us that the only jobs we would get without a PhD would be as social workers for LA Unified School District. I changed majors to Hospitality Management, but still wish I had completed my Psych degree as I have found employers have cared more about the fact that I have a degree, rather than what it was specifically in. Go figure.

  35. I just graduated this spring with a BSc in Chemistry. I hated every moment of the last 2 1/2 years of my degree but stuck with it because I’m prideful and refused to admit I made the wrong choice. Now I have a degree in a field I hate and have zero desire to get a job in. If I had to do it all again I would probably not have gone to university right out of high school. I chose my major based on what I did well in in high school, not what I enjoyed doing. Five years later I still don’t know what I enjoy doing and I have 25K of debt for a peice of paper that means nothing to me. Now I’m just trying to find a job that allows me to save so I can pursue what I DO like (once I figure out what that is). I’m hoping the fact that I managed to stick it out and actually did finish and have a degree in something will give me bonus points, even if the employer raises his eyebrows and goes “You majored in chemistry… why are you applying HERE?!”

    • Don’t be so hard on yourself. You know, I struggled with some of the same issues..not really being passionate about any one thing. One of my good friends told me that the more talented you are, the more difficult it is to figure out what to do with your life. The reality is that you could probably be good at a lot of things and that’s what makes it hard. Not knowing which option will suit you best can be very frustrating.

      My friend’s sister loves animals and it’s hard to picture her doing anything but work with animals. The reality is that she isn’t that complex of a person and doesn’t have too many interests beyond animals, so her career path was pretty black and white.

      In my opinion, there is no dream job/career, but there are aspects of many jobs that are interesting. What’s worked for me was that as long as kept learning something new at my current job, I was challenged and relatively happy. Once I felt comfortable, I’d start looking for the next job. It’s essier to do this at bigger companies, but I think even at smaller ones, I’d be surprised if anyone turned a request away for taking on more responsibiity if you’re competent at your core job.

  36. banking and corporate finance. i was similar to you when you started with accounting. i tried to take a challenging track to set myself up for long term success. with a back ground in business and accounting i definitely opened doors for myself.

    that being said now i do sales and business development. we all have different paths its all about finding what you are comfortable with and going for it 100%.

  37. I loved university. I took one of those degrees that is on the list….EDUCATION with a degree in Child and Youth Studies. But in Canada so the salary is a bit higher…but right now it’s not since there are no jobs. If I could do university over again I would take a few different courses. I would get the same degree but I would get a teachable in math (love math and a teachable would allow me to teach higher grades). Also I would take an ASL language course. I LOVED the practical courses with placements I took, and those ones look great on the resume (mostly psychology courses I took). I think I would have also joined some more activities in school, it had a lot to offer and I didn’t really get that involved.

  38. I majored in Business – which is a Bachelor of Commerce (BCOMM) in Canada. I did my concentration in Human Resources and I loved University and my job! I would not change my major since I knew that I wanted to do Business well, forever. I was that girl who wanted to be the banker when I would have all my friends oome over and play Monopoly.
    I went to a fairly large University in my city and the business program is quite good so I wouldn’t change a thing!
    I would be surprised if anyone said they regret thier education!

  39. BA in History
    MA in Religion

    THAT DOES NOTHING for me!!!!!

    working on a degree that will benefit me tremendously, because of the fact that my past two degree show nothing of my potential, even though I know that I am better than 95% of the people that they are interviewing.

  40. I don’t have my degree. I love learning, but don’t always do well with classroom learning.

    The only thing that made me wish I had gotten my degree is there are so many jobs that won’t even look at me because of my lack of education and work history at 24 years old. Most people I meet don’t believe I didn’t go to college because I’m very articulate, but its very hard to get my foot in the door. I know if I can get an interview I can impress people but, its very difficult to get to that step. This issue is exasperated by the current economy and the fact that I had to move for my husbands education right after we got married and will be moving again once my husband finishes his masters.

    My husband has his BA in Film and Media studies. He told me if he could do it all over again he would have gotten his degree in software design. He decided he didn’t like film about 2 years in, but would have had to spend and extra year in order to switch so he chose to finish. He is currently earning his Masters in Interactive Technology and graduates in December.

  41. 1. Finance

    2. No. I absolutely LOVED my major! It’s exactly what I wanted to do and is directly related to my current career path… plus, it got me HOOKED on personal finance and helped me start my blog! 🙂 But if my school has offered two other specific majors, I might have reconsidered. I think it would have been awesome to be a Geography major or Hospitality/Tourism major! (Because I’m a travel nut. LOL.)

    The funny part? Even having a major that is not listed above, I still make the average of all of those salaries!

  42. No, not really. I often think I should’ve done a generic BA, then a post grad in journalism. I would’ve been more wellrounded and had more to draw from. I would also have had a buttload more debt, or debt at all (certainly $10k plus). I had a full ride doing communications.

  43. I flunked out of school for no reason other than laziness. I ended up finishing almost 2 years of general ed at a community college and twice tried to go back to university but both times halted right at the start for a change in circumstances. I don’t think I’d have liked what I was originally going for anyway – art education with a math minor. Yeah, I’m weird like that. Now I’m a sahm of 4 and doubt I’ll be back in the workforce for many years. Maybe someday I’ll finish a degree in something just because I like it but I’m not in any hurry.

  44. Major: Mechanical Engineering

    I don’t think I’d choose a different major. I was lucky enough to get a very good job out of school in 2008 right before the economy decided to crap out and keep it through 10% layoffs.

    If I did go a different route it would be in education, but I would be in more trouble because of student loans. I was lucky/smart enough to go into a pretty well-paying field from a relatively low-cost (though still far from cheap!) state university. It still drives me nuts to see that 16k student loan balance, but at least I plan on killing that off well before 2018.

    Better than my friend with nearly 200k in loans for a Bachelor’s who now thinks he wants to be a teacher…

  45. Major: Civil Engineering, 1998

    I think I picked the correct major. I enjoy the work. I have had steady employment for the last 12 years and a decent salary to back it up. What could be better.

  46. BFA Interior Design
    I figured out my junior year abroad that I didn’t want to do interior design, but didn’t know what to change my major to and my school was pretty much completely paid for. I’m torn on the subject of college because my degree means very little to me, but even though I don’t use it I wouldn’t have even been able to get the jobs that I have had working for colleges without it. I think apprenticeships need to become a major source of skill training again. Most people go to college for 4 years and take classes that don’t prepare them in any way for the the job that they will eventually get. If I had realized that interior design is basically sales with some creative work I probably would have re-thought the whole thing. I think that everyone should at least do an internship before they graduate so they have an idea if they will like what they are going to be doing.

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