Should You Consider a Late Retirement?

If you don’t have enough saved for retirement, a late retirement is probably the easiest way to catch up on retirement savings. A few more years of work mean much more money to invest at a time when you may be at your earning prime. Of course, inadequate retirement savings isn’t the only reason to keep working. Some people love their jobs, and can’t imagine retiring to a more quiet existence.

So should you consider retiring late? Here’s what to consider as you make your decision.

Benefits of Late Retirement

A late retirement means more time to save money, and less time spent with a fixed income. You may also earn delayed retirement credits through Social Security, which can mean up to an 8% increase in annual payouts. If you’re worried about pinching pennies in retirement, that’s money that’s hard to turn down.

Working into retirement doesn’t even have to mean staying at your current job. You might cut back to part-time work or become a consultant. If you have some savings, then late retirement might mean a more flexible approach to how you work.

Signs a Late Retirement Might Be for You

So how do you know if a late retirement is the right choice? Some signs that continuing to work could be in your best interests include:

  • You don’t have a compelling reason to stay home.
  • You’re in good health and are able to keep working.
  • You like, or can at least tolerate, your job.
  • You don’t have enough saved to retire now.

How to Avoid Late Retirement Penalties

Early retirement can cost you a lot, but there are no real late retirement pennies—aside, of course, from the gamble that you might not live as long as you hope. The one penalty you need to watch out for is the Medicare late enrollment penalty. You must enroll when you turn 65. If you don’t, you could pay higher premiums for the rest of your life. That’s money you could put toward your savings, and money you can’t afford to lose if you’re already worried you don’t have enough.

You Only Live Once

If you’re on the fence about late retirement, it’s time to get realistic about things. Talk to your spouse, your children, to other loved ones you trust, and to a retirement advisor. If you can make retirement work now, you might want to. You only get one life, and you don’t know how long you’ll have. You might be happier knowing you spent time with your family instead of toiling away at the office—but only an informed conversation can help you make that decision.

If you think you have enough money, one way to build a small extra pile of cash is through a reverse mortgage. Available to seniors over the age of 62 who own their homes, this option taps into your home’s equity to give you money. You don’t have to repay the funds as long as you live in your house and comply with the loan’s terms. The money can be used to start a savings account, as a rainy day fund, or even to help support your grandkids.

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