Roth IRA

  I was checking my twitter stream yesterday when I stumbled on an article by my girl Sandy titled “I Bought A Rental Home With My 401K“. If you’re too lazy to click-through and read the article the gist is Sandy took out a $40,000 401K loan to pay cash on a $38,000 investment property […]

Roth IRAwareness

March 27, 2012 · 39 comments

So yesterday was Roth IRA awareness day, where hundreds of personal finance bloggers banded together to spread the good news about Roths. I’m sure you noticed I wrote no such post, in fact, I wrote no post at all yesterday. While I’d like to pretend this is just because I am so rebellious I go against societal […]

Double Standard

December 11, 2011 · 15 comments

I have two investment vehicles established for retirement, My Roth IRA and my 401K. I don’t play favorites with these two accounts and if it was within my control, I would contribute to them equally (unfortunately the federal government puts a cap on Roth contributions). If you follow my net worth updates at all, you’ll […]

Keeping it simple today because we had a crazy night yesterday (we had 20 high school freshmen over for an epic game night). Let’s jump right in to it shall we? I’ve always believed investing should be kept simple. In fact, I probably keep things too simple. Since I am young, I have chosen to […]

I opened up my first checking/savings account with Washington Mutual when I was 16. I loved WaMu and was not happy when Chase acquired them a couple years ago. I was a die hard WaMu fan, but had absolutely no loyalties to Chase, especially once they tried changing the terms of my checking account requirements. […]

For three years now I’ve had a crazy love affair with my Roth IRA. It’s consistently been my favorite investment vehicle for serious wealth building. The long term tax benefit and the wonders of compound interest will surely give all PF lovers a warm fuzzy feeling inside. At least, it use to give me that […]

Just about every personal finance guru has an opinion on how much you should contribute to retirement. Their suggestions usually falls between 10% and 20% of your gross income. For as long as I’ve been at this personal finance thing (since 2007), I’ve decided 15% is my lucky number. Here’s what my retirement contributions looked […]